Book Review of Leah Ingram’s Suddenly Frugal

I consider myself a lifetime learner.  Maybe that is one of the reasons why I feel compelled to read anything I can get my hands on.  My past experience as a book reviewer for an arts and entertainment magazine put me into contact with nearly every publishing house in the United States.  I will be the first to admit how exciting it can be to get a box full of books to read in the mail.

I am really drawn to instructional books on the topics of personal finance, self-sufficiency, and saving.  Maybe that is one reason why Leah Ingram’s Suddenly Frugal: How to Live Happier & Healthier For Less appealed to me.  As a woman who has seen what kind of devastating effects a recession can have on the economy firsthand, what better way is there to prepare myself for what is yet to come than to pick up some pointers on cutting back and saving more?

Although I like to consider myself a bit of an expert when it comes to living on a dime, I often find there are others out there that can offer a piece of advice or two that can really help me financially.  Leah Ingram happens to be one such person.  The mother and author made some drastic changes in her life in 2007 in an attempt to secure a better future for her family.  Not only did she revolutionize her relationship with money, she had a lot of fun in the process.  Rather than do without “luxuries”, she suggests several cost effective alternatives.

For example, did you know that a night at the movies for a family of four can cost over $50? Now talk about a budget buster!  Rather than be in the red at the end of the month, many families use Redbox which holds up to 200 different movies.  To rent one, it costs $1 a night plus fees which you pay for with your choice of credit or debit card.  You can purchase a box of microwave popcorn, a bottle or two of soda, and theatre sized boxes of candy for less than $10.  That’s what I call savings!

Suddenly Frugal was written with budget-consciousness in mind.  The chapters address most subjects that are of concern in recession-hit households‒clothing, transportation, food, entertainment, and special occasions.  Although many people associate frugality with being a miser, this book dispels that myth by being informative and insightful.  It provides realistic solutions to everyday needs and even provides information about groups and organizations that are designed to help people save.

At $12.95, purchasing a copy of Adams Media’s Suddenly Frugal won’t break the bank.  It is a quick read, well-organized, and can help save families up to $25,000 in a year’s time.  That’s why I chose to read it and pass its knowledge on.  In today’s world, you can never be prepared enough financially.

Author: Charissa

Charissa is into frugal living and saving money.

2 comments
nick d
nick d

@ melissa, good advice! everything is relative when it comes to money. thanks for the book review, if you are looking for other books to review I'd recommend "Discovering Hidden Treasures" by Dan Thompson.

Melissa @PureFi
Melissa @PureFi

Thanks for the book review! I'll have to check this one out next time I'm at the bookstore.

It seems that frugal has become more fashionable thanks not only to the recent recession but also the environmental movement toward reduced consumption.

A word of advice for couples and families: make sure you, your spouse and/or your kids have the same definition of "frugal." I've learned that the definition varies wildly between individuals. If that is the case, behavior varies wildly also. Everyone has to get on the same page to reach shared goals.