Generating Income When You Are Off the Grid

If you’re ready to trade in the fast paced life that you’re living for one that is quieter or self-sufficient, listen up. No matter how savvy you are, you’re going to need to generate some income in one way or another. In fact, even the most die-hard survivalists know that it’s near impossible to live without cash.

You’re going to need supplies and the only real way to acquire necessities is by bartering for them or buying them. It is neither cheap nor is it free to move off grid. According to The Everything Guide to Living Off the Grid: A Back-To-Basics Manual For Independent Living by Terri Reid, “The reality is, even if you are totally self-sufficient, there is no escaping expenses like property taxes.” With that said, let’s examine some of the author’s suggestions for generating income off the grid.

Depending on your needs, the type of property you choose to live in, and the nature of side projects you decide to take on, living off-grid can be very expensive. There will equipment to buy and livestock to acquire. You may want to install solar panels to replace traditional electricity sources or purchase rain barrels to collect water. These expenses add up. Without a steady stream of income coming in, it may be impossible to make your dreams of self-sufficiency come true.

Reid suggests first speaking to your current employer to see if you can telecommute. If your boss isn’t keen on you working from home, you’ll want to do a self-assessment and consider the different skills you possess that others will find marketable. Do you know how to design websites? Create custom newsletters? Write product reviews? If you do, you’ll find a treasure trove of opportunities through Craigslist.

If you possess carpentry, painting, remodeling or plumbing skills, chances are you’ll get a lot of referrals through family members and friends. Advertise through your local newspaper or create your own free WordPress blog and Twitter accounts. Both are free and allow you to customize messages. They serve as virtually free advertising.

Here are a few other ideas for you to consider whenever you’re planning to move off-grid. Reid lists the following as legitimate ways to acquire what you and your family needs:

  • Bartering and Dealing ‒ Why pay cash for something you can acquire by trading goods or services? “The key to successful bartering is to be sure that you offer equal value for whatever you are bartering for,” says Reid.
  • Farmers’ Markets ‒ If you have excess produce and herbs from your garden or farm, this is the perfect place to get rid of it and make a profit. Making sure that your bounty is fresh, clean, and visually appealing will help you sell it.
  • Craft Sales ‒ High-quality artisanal work is in demand. Whether it’s beautiful quilts that you create or mixed media art pieces, one thing is certain. There is a market for these items. It’s up to you to find it.
  • Online Stores like Etsy.com ‒ Having your own website is the norm these days. Make sure that yours is professional and easy-to-navigate. If it’s cluttered or unattractive, people will be hesitant to buy from you.

Learn more about living off the grid by picking up Reid’s book. In it, she addresses the different types of shelters you can live in, the buzz about beekeeping, the importance of herbs, and dealing with rodents, critters, and pests of all kinds.

 

Author: Charissa

Charissa is into frugal living and saving money.

1 comments
nathanieltoney
nathanieltoney

What other people fail to see is that moving off the grid is a choice; for whatever reason we might never understand. These ideas here are good and I might as well suggest this to someone I know going through this stage of his life. He may not need my help but I can at least support him.

C in DC
C in DC

Are you off the grid if you're relying on the Internet? Not in my view.