Writing for Demand Studios to Earn Some Extra Money

What’s So Great About Writing For Demand Studios?

Demand Studios provides article and video content to websites like YouTube,  eHowGolfLinkTrails, and AOL.  The company hires freelance writers, copy editors, independent filmmakers, transcribers, and title proofers to complete tens of thousands of assignments for these clients.  Payment depends on the content created and submitted weekly to your PayPal account.  Project descriptions are viewable through your own personal dashboard once you are accepted to Demand Studios.

The Benefits of Working For Demand Studios

As an Independent Contractor, you have the freedom to work from anywhere in the world.  As long as you are a US Citizen and have access to an internet connection, you will be able to visit the website, accept and submit assignments, and view your payment statement for the month.  In addition to these benefits, you also have:

  • More control over your resources.  You do not have a “boss” in a physical sense.  You can take on as few or as many assignments as your schedule will permit.  The only person you have to answer to is an Editor who may suggest corrections to the piece that you are working on.
  • No invoices or timesheets.  Demand Studio’s handy interface calculates this information for you.  You can view your earnings for the week, the month, and the year conveniently.
  • A variety of subject matter.  You can accept assignments that reflect your values and interests.  There is no need to do something you hate when there are so many projects available that you love.
  • Access to limited medical plans depending on output.  Individuals that have worked with Demand Studios for 3 months and averaged 30 articles a month (writers), 200 articles reviewed a month (copy editors), and 30 videos a month (filmmakers) receive an enrollment form for insurance benefits by email.  There are no deductibles or co-pays, guaranteed acceptance despite pre-existing conditions or family medical history, and a discount prescription drug card.

Few work-from-home employers offer the type of perks Demand Studios offers to its Independent Contractors.  In addition to a regular paycheck and a wide range of projects to choose from, men and women become eligible for health insurance benefits which ordinarily cost them a mint.

Even if you aren’t looking for a full-time gig, completing a few assignments a month for the company can help you pay for your child’s music lessons, make that much needed household repair or put something in the bank for a rainy day.  What more can you ask for?  You can apply for free by visiting Demand Studios (http://www.demandstudios.com) today.  You never know, you may find yourself with more work than you ever dreamed possible!

Charissa Arsaoui is a freelance writer for ChickSpeak, Buzzine, DisFUNKshion Magazine, Student Stuff, and a guest contributor for Wisebread.  She loves thrift related topics and can spot a bargain a mile away.

Author: Charissa

Charissa is into frugal living and saving money.

14 comments
Demand Studios Writer
Demand Studios Writer

It's okay for what it is. It's a good way to make extra cash but I wouldn't settle down there for too long unless you figure out how to write fast.

Mary
Mary

@ Karen -- totally agreed! I know of at least one web publishing company that fired most of it's editorial staff and started to use content mills instead -- paying less than $10.00 an article. (They used to have competitions with certain topics and the "best" article would get published and paid for). It's disgusting.

I find it odd that Americans get so upset over their jobs being farmed out to foreign countries for pennies on the dollar when content mills do basically the same thing in the U.S.

Karen
Karen

Demand Studios, like AllVoices.com, doesn't have a positive reputation among many professional freelance writers. This is because once you sell an article to Demand Studios, you give up all rights to it. Which means you can't resell it to another publication, but Demand can keep using it forever. They also have the option of selling it to other content mill providers, earning more profit while you never see another dime. IMO, people who are willing to write for pitiful wages devalue the craft of writing for all writers. Because if you don't value your work, no one else will either. If you want to work for free, volunteer your writing talent at a nonprofit. There are lots of worthy, cash-poor orgs out there that would be glad to have help writing press releases, etc. That kind of writing helps you get better paying gigs than content mills.

Eric Novinson
Eric Novinson

It takes me about an hour to write a DS article, if it takes you two hours it may not be worth it. That's effectively $15/hour although it's contract income so you are responsible for other expenses. As for people who say it's better to work retail or fast food, I have worked those jobs in the past and have friends currently working in them, and working for Demand is much better in my opinion.

Credit Girl
Credit Girl

Cool! I had no idea about this but I definitely know some people whom I could recommend this to because they love freelance jobs! Thanks for sharing!

Beth
Beth

@Asrai, you're right, I don't live in the U.S. :) I really don't know how I feel about services like DS. One the one hand, I feel people should feel free to work for as much or as little as they want. On the other hand, I wonder if DS and services like it are exploiting people. Most of the content on sites like Associate Content and others isn't that well written, but our society seems to have a fetish for cheap goods.

asrai
asrai

I dunno where you live but most places in the USA minmum wage is around $7.25/hr. http://www.dol.gov/whd/minwage/america.htm#Consolidated None are over $9.

Yep some people are making more money doing other things online/work at home. Some are not. I'm not saying DS is a good or bad place to work, I'm just saying that it might not be that bad for the pay.

Net Age Web Design
Net Age Web Design

$15 for 2 hours work is good money in many a third world country. Why is this for US Citizens only, because you'll be able to get loads of good worker bees flocking to you from foreign shores for this kind of cash.

Beth
Beth

@ Asrai -- medical transcriptions, teaching online, tutoring online, making your own crafts/jewellery products and selling them online, web content management, collections, bookkeeping, desktop publishing, regular freelance writing, consulting, hairdressing, seamstress -- These are all jobs people I know have held working from home, and I guarantee they were making more than minimum wage.

Let's say an article takes two hours of your time, from finding the topic to writing it, editing it and working through revisions with the copy editor to when it's published. The MOST you can make is $15 (for flat fee articles). That's $7.50 an hour. (Where I live, even students under 18 make a minimum wage of $9.60/hour and adults make $10.25).

Sure, you can't beat the convenience of a work at home job, but I think people should put some time and effort into finding the right one and think very hard about what kind of price they put on their time.

Jenn Mattern
Jenn Mattern

Their information about their health plans is misleading at best. "No co-pays" is one thing. What they don't tell you lumped in that marketing copy is that they pay a very limited amount, and for very limited instances -- meaning you'll still "co-pay" the difference in cost every time. The pre-existing conditions marketing statement is also very misleading. To say there are no exclusions is downright incorrect. In all but California for example, you can't use it for coverage if you know you're pregnant when you sign up (for anything related to the pregnancy at least). More importantly, if you dig into the fine print you'll find that there's also a 12month exclusion if you know you have a serious health condition that would otherwise be eligible for critical coverage -- meaning if you're on heart medication and you have a heart attack during that first year, you probably won't be covered. Never take marketing copy at face value. They spout those claims to try to suck in writers, and the simple fact is that most consumers don't read the fine print. Make sure you do before you sign up and start churning out cheap content for their benefit.

asrai
asrai

Sure you could make more money doing a lot of things Beth, but few offer the same flexibility or work at home feature.

Beth
Beth

Ooops... Just noticed in a previous post that Demand Studios pays a maximum of $15 an article or offers revenue share. In either case, I think people might earn more money working at fast food joint instead!

Beth
Beth

This sounds like sponsored content, and doesn't cover any of the negative aspects of using such a service. I'd be curious to see if On Demand is one of these content mills that pays next to nothing for articles or if they pay a decent wage.

Kalen
Kalen

I wouldn't call it 2 hours worth of work. I write articles about the same length as Demand Studios and can finish them in about 15-30 min. Even if it takes 30 that's still $30 an hour.